Wow!  Enjoyed a delightful walk  on a “cool” beautiful morning  recently on The Ridge Trail, one of the few bottomland hardwood forests left in coastal New Orleans due to hurricanes and saltwater intrusion.  See the growth of new trees and vegetation as compared to after  Hurricane Katrina which destroyed 80% of the tree canopy.  Explore on a private group  ecotour with The Great Delta Tours coming soon at www.thegreatdeltatours.com!

Located in the Bayou Sauvage National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and still within the city limits of New Orleans, this beautiful piece of nature is sacred ground as habitat and food for a web of life that lives there.  It is also precious because it acts as a “speed bump” in reducing the impact of hurricanes and storms on the city of New Orleans.  As you move away from  the higher elevations of The Ridge Forest, the land gradually slopes downward into beautiful marsh.   Only about  5% of the 24,000-acre refuge is still covered by ridge forests today.  The continued restoration of The Ridge Trail and the marshes of and around the Bayou Sauvage Wildlife Refuge are critical to the future of the New Orleans and surrounding communities.

Thanks to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,  the Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater New Orleans and many other groups who have planted trees and restored wetlands in Bayou Sauvage  over the past 15 years.  If you want to a make a difference in the delta, volunteer to plant a tree and make a positive impact on nature and the region’s future.